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Do You Care About the Environment,
but Want to Pursue Your Passion?

If you like...

Astronomy

You will love...

Mining

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 1060 OR MATH 1080 OR MATH 1210 OR MATH 1220 OR MATH 1310 OR MATH 1320.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Reasoning (Statistics/Logic)
 
Description
Use of transit, level, total station GPS, and other equipment in field surveying. Practical astronomy, calculation procedures, state plane coordinates, public-land division and introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Field demonstration and use of surveying equipment illustrate concepts presented in lecture. Laboratory fee assessed.

 

 



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Biomedical Engineering

You will love...

Metallurgy

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Co-requisites: CHEM 1210 OR Equivalent.
 
Description
Introduction to metallurgical processing fundamentals and applied technology that are to separate minerals and chemically process minerals to produce high purity metals as well as the application of these principles and technologies in areas such as biomedical devices and sensors, energy conversion and storage, and nuclear material processing.






If you like...

Chemistry

 

 

 



You will love...

Atmospheric Sciences

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 1050 AND CHEM 1210.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
 
Description
An intermediate-level introduction to the atmospheric sciences for both atmospheric science majors and other scientists and engineers. Topics include the structure of atmosphere, atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud physics, radiative transfer, and atmospheric dynamics.

Geology & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Recommended Prerequisites: MATH 1210 AND CHEM 1210.
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
 
Description
This course will explore the different systems that shape our evolving Earth through time. We will consider the planet’s formation and composition; history of continents and oceans; and balance of life and energy. We will introduce the many systems that drive change on Earth through time: tectonics, water, carbon, life, and climate. Students will learn what distinguishes the major phases of Earth’s past, and will become familiar with the fundamental cycles that shape present environments and ecosystems. This course serves as context for subsequent Geology and Geophysics core curriculum.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: GEO 1100 OR GEO 1110 AND CHEM 1210.
Pre/Co-requisites: MATH 1210.
Recommended Co-requisite: PHYS 2210 (or PHYS 2010 for ESCT major).
 
Description
This course will consist of an introduction to thermodynamic and geochemical concepts and their application to describe geologic processes and phenomena on and beneath the Earth’s surface. Students will learn fundamental chemical and mathematical approaches to quantitatively describe, interpret and predict a wide range of geochemical processes in Earth systems, and will learn the basic chemical and isotopic characteristics of materials making up the Earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: GEO 1100 OR GEO 1110 AND GEO 2100.
Recommended Pre/co-requisite: MATH 1220.
 
Description
In this course, students will learn how to identify minerals in hand samples and in thin sections (using a petrographic microscope) and how to relate these observations with physical and chemical properties of the minerals. The foundations of mineralogy will also be covered, including: crystallography, chemical bonding, controls on mineral structure, mineral stability, and crystal growth. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

Metallurgy

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Co-requisites: CHEM 1210 OR Equivalent.
 
Description
Introduction to metallurgical processing fundamentals and applied technology that are to separate minerals and chemically process minerals to produce high purity metals as well as the application of these principles and technologies in areas such as biomedical devices and sensors, energy conversion and storage, and nuclear material processing.

Course Details
Units: 4.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: 'C-' or better in CHEM 1220 AND MATH 2250
 
Description
Continuation of Metallurgical thermodynamics I in which changes in Gibb’s free energy and chemical potential are used to work with phase and chemical reaction equilibrium problems. Covers single phase equilibrium, multi-component phase equilibrium, non-ideal gas equations of state, ideal and non-ideal solutions, chemical reactions involving gaseous and condensed phases, construction and interpretation of phase diagrams, electrochemistry, and equilibrium behavior of ionic solutions.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: 'C-' or better in CHEM 1220 AND PHYS 2210.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
 
Description
Phase transformations in metals and alloys: Elementary physical chemistry of phases, phase diagrams and phase rule application, diffusion in solids, structure of interfaces, nucleation and growth, solidification, pearlitic, bainitic, massive and order-disorder transformations, precipitation, elementary treatment of martensitic transformation, iron-carbon system, and heat-treatment of steels. Laboratory sessions illustrate principles developed in lectures.



If you like...

Climate Change




You will love...

Atmospheric Sciences

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
Explores the natural and human induced variations in the Earth's climate. Emphasis will be placed on the evidence underlying climate change and the factors that control Earth's climate. Topics range from climate of the Earth's history, present-day global warming, climatic effects of volcanic eruptions, to impacts of climate change on hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and droughts.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 1050.
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
Interactions among components of the climate system are examined, especially interactions concerning the atmosphere, oceans, land surfaces, and sea ice. After completion of the course, knowledge of the physical processes underlying climate dynamics will enable students to evaluate and understand projected climate change and variability.

Geology & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Recommended Prerequisites: MATH 1210 AND CHEM 1210.
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
 
Description
This course will explore the different systems that shape our evolving Earth through time. We will consider the planet’s formation and composition; history of continents and oceans; and balance of life and energy. We will introduce the many systems that drive change on Earth through time: tectonics, water, carbon, life, and climate. Students will learn what distinguishes the major phases of Earth’s past, and will become familiar with the fundamental cycles that shape present environments and ecosystems. This course serves as context for subsequent Geology and Geophysics core curriculum.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: Knowledge of Basic Algebra (Recommended).
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
Graduate students should enroll in GEOG 5368 or GEO 5368 and will be held to higher standards and/or more work. This class provides an introduction to critical energy issues facing our planet, with a focus on controversial topics and issues in Utah. These may include: hydraulic fracturing (fracking), offshore oil and gas development, oil shale and tar sand development, nuclear energy, renewable energy technologies such as wind and geothermal, the smart grid, difficulties in commercializing new energy technologies, air pollution, transportation choices, energy policy development, and global issues including population dynamics, climate change, carbon management, water resources, the Law of Unintended Consequences, and tipping points. A number of outstanding guest lecturers will provide expertise in their respective fields.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 1210.
 
Description
Computer and numerical methods for solving applied geoscience problems. Develops the computational skills required to solve problems in landscape evolution, geologic hazards, and Earth systems. Meets computer programming requirement for Geology and Geological Engineering majors.

 

If you like...

Computer Science

You will love...

Geology & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 1210.
 
Description
Computer and numerical methods for solving applied geoscience problems. Develops the computational skills required to solve problems in landscape evolution, geologic hazards, and Earth systems. Meets computer programming requirement for Geology and Geological Engineering majors.

Mining

Course Details
Units: 2.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Description
This course introduces two basic skills important for engineers, graphics-centric computational design using Vulcan, and Python programming. In Vulcan, students will be introduced to creating basic 3D graphics objects and conducting basic computations such as volumes and tonnages. In Python, students will be introduced to basic programming concepts including variables, expressions, conditional statements, iteration, and lists.

 

If you like...

Construction Engineering

You will love...

Mining

Course Details
Units: 1.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MG EN 3015
Corequisites: MATH 1210
 
Description
The mineral industry in perspective; mining law, prospecting, mineral exploration, orebody modeling, drilling, blasting and haulage, mining methods, economics, permitting and reclamation.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MG EN 1050 AND MG EN 3010 AND GEO 3065.
 
Description
Prospeting mineral exploration, orebody modeling. Surface mining techniques--open pit, area mining, solution mining, auger mining, and dredging. Unit operations--drilling, blasting, loading, haulage, and reclamation.

Course Details
Units: 2.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MG EN 1050 AND MG EN 5150.
 
Description
Applications of structural design in mining; Analysis and design of structural steel beams, sections, columns, and welded/bolted connections; Reinforced concrete beams, walls, and columns; Earth pressures for retaining walls and footing design.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MG EN 5150.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
 
Description
Slope Stability; Elastic design of underground excavations in rock, support systems--bolting, steel sets, concrete liners, stope fill, mine subsidence.

 

If you like...

Film

You will love...

Geology & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
Earth Scientists study a wide range of provocative subjects with real-world implications for society, from evolution and extinction to natural disasters. Unsurprisingly, many of these subjects are also of interest to movie-makers in Hollywood and beyond, whose exciting thrillers sometimes do justice to the science and sometimes make a mess of it. This course explores current Earth science research themes in the context of film. Each week centers on a feature-length film and the science behind it, including presentation of the current state of the science, critique of the movie’s depiction of the science, and discussion of societal implications.

 

 



If you like...

Geography

 

 

 

You will love...

Atmospheric Sciences

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
Survey of the fundamentals of atmospheric science with an emphasis on severe and hazardous weather including hurricanes, thunderstorms, tornadoes, flash floods, and snowstorms.

Geography & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Recommended Prerequisites: MATH 1210 AND CHEM 1210.
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
 
Description
This course will explore the different systems that shape our evolving Earth through time. We will consider the planet’s formation and composition; history of continents and oceans; and balance of life and energy. We will introduce the many systems that drive change on Earth through time: tectonics, water, carbon, life, and climate. Students will learn what distinguishes the major phases of Earth’s past, and will become familiar with the fundamental cycles that shape present environments and ecosystems. This course serves as context for subsequent Geology and Geophysics core curriculum.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Field Work and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Recommended Co-requisites: GEO 1100.
 
Description
This course will explore the Wasatch fault system and related phenomena such as landslides and groundwater hydrology using techniques from a broad array of geoscience disciplines. Investigative techniques will include geological field mapping, slope characterization, Lidar mapping, seismic and gravity surveys, and data collection from groundwater wells. Weekly lectures will introduce methods and problems to be explored, and discuss and analyze results from the field exercises. One lecture, one lab weekly.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Requirement Designation: International Requirement & P/L Sci Exploration
 
Description
Where and why do earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur today? How do local cultural attitudes and economic conditions affect the local consequences of earthquakes and volcanoes? The concept of plate tectonics explains global patterns of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Hazards, prediction, and societal impacts are considered, using examples from many countries.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
This is an interdisciplinary course that explores all aspects of the ocean including origins and evolution of ocean basins, physical and chemical properties of seawater, and links between circulation, currents, and climate, coastal processes, human interactions, and sustainability of ocean systems. Students will develop an “oceanic” perspective of earth systems, examine oceanic processes and the relationships between the ocean and other earth systems, and appreciate how the oceans influences societies and how humans affect the ocean.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisite: GEO 3100.
 
Description
Study of processes driving the dynamic form and evolution of Earth’s surface, focusing on the mechanics of physical and chemical interactions between ice, water, air, rock, sediment and soil. This course provides an overview of Earth surface processes and the landforms they produce. Topics include weathering and erosion, glaciers and periglacial processes, hillslopes and mass movements, earthquakes, and fluvial systems. Two lectures and one exercise period per week; one mandatory full-day field trip.



If you like...

Geographic Information Science

 

You will love...

Mining

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 1060 OR MATH 1080 OR MATH 1210 OR MATH 1220 OR MATH 1310 OR MATH 1320.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Reasoning (Statistics/Logic)
 
Description
Use of transit, level, total station GPS, and other equipment in field surveying. Practical astronomy, calculation procedures, state plane coordinates, public-land division and introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Field demonstration and use of surveying equipment illustrate concepts presented in lecture. Laboratory fee assessed.

 

 

 

 

 

If you like...

Hazards

You will love...

Atmospheric Sciences

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
Explores the natural and human induced variations in the Earth's climate. Emphasis will be placed on the evidence underlying climate change and the factors that control Earth's climate. Topics range from climate of the Earth's history, present-day global warming, climatic effects of volcanic eruptions, to impacts of climate change on hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and droughts.

Geology & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Requirement Designation: International Requirement & P/L Sci Exploration
 
Description
Where and why do earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur today? How do local cultural attitudes and economic conditions affect the local consequences of earthquakes and volcanoes? The concept of plate tectonics explains global patterns of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Hazards, prediction, and societal impacts are considered, using examples from many countries.



If you like...

Health

You will love...

Atmospheric Sciences

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
Explores the natural and human induced variations in the Earth's climate. Emphasis will be placed on the evidence underlying climate change and the factors that control Earth's climate. Topics range from climate of the Earth's history, present-day global warming, climatic effects of volcanic eruptions, to impacts of climate change on hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and droughts.

Mining

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MG EN 5010 AND MG EN 5320 AND (CH EN 2300 OR ME EN 2300).
 
Description
Application of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics to design of mine ventilation systems and mine plans. Health and safety aspects of the mine environment, application of ventilation survey instruments and computer simulations. Laboratory fee assessed.

 

If you like...

History

You will love...

Geology & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
 
Description
Dinosaurs are the most celebrated fossil organisms. These remarkably diverse and successful animals inhabited every major continent, persisted more than 150 million years, and evolved numerous bizarre forms of varying body sizes. This course presents an overview of the major dinosaur groups and places them into temporal, biogeographic, and ecological context. Topics include modes of preservation, feeding adaptations, social behavior, evolution, extinction, and the origin of birds. Dinosaurs are also used as a vehicle to introduce the scientific method.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Recommended Prerequisites: MATH 1210 AND CHEM 1210.
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
 
Description
This course will explore the different systems that shape our evolving Earth through time. We will consider the planet’s formation and composition; history of continents and oceans; and balance of life and energy. We will introduce the many systems that drive change on Earth through time: tectonics, water, carbon, life, and climate. Students will learn what distinguishes the major phases of Earth’s past, and will become familiar with the fundamental cycles that shape present environments and ecosystems. This course serves as context for subsequent Geology and Geophysics core curriculum.

Metallurgy

Course Details
Units: 1.5
Course Components: Lecture
 
Description
Introduction to mineral resources, extraction methods and plant practices. Basic principles and operations of extractive metallurgy. Historical perspective of processing of metallic materials.

 

If you like...

Mathematics

 

 

You will love...

Atmospheric Sciences

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 1050 AND CHEM 1210.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
 
Description
An intermediate-level introduction to the atmospheric sciences for both atmospheric science majors and other scientists and engineers. Topics include the structure of atmosphere, atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud physics, radiative transfer, and atmospheric dynamics.

Geology & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: GEO 1100 OR GEO 1110 AND CHEM 1210.
Pre/Co-requisites: MATH 1210.
Recommended Co-requisite: PHYS 2210 (or PHYS 2010 for ESCT major).
 
Description
This course will consist of an introduction to thermodynamic and geochemical concepts and their application to describe geologic processes and phenomena on and beneath the Earth’s surface. Students will learn fundamental chemical and mathematical approaches to quantitatively describe, interpret and predict a wide range of geochemical processes in Earth systems, and will learn the basic chemical and isotopic characteristics of materials making up the Earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: GEO 1100 OR GEO 1110 AND GEO 2100 AND PHYS 2210 (or PHYS 2010 for ESCT major).
Recommended Pre/co-requisite: MATH 1220, PHYS 2220 (or PHYS 2020 for ESCT major), GEO 2500.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
 
Description
This course will focus on the application of continuum mechanics to describe geologic processes and phenomena. We will cover a range of diverse topics spanning the inner and outer Earth including: elasticity, tectonics, heat flow, gravity, electromagnetism, fluid dynamics, faulting, seismology, surface processes, and geological hazards. Students will learn fundamental physical and mathematical approaches to quantitatively describe, interpret, and predict a broad range of dynamic processes in Earth systems. Two lectures, one interactive workshop weekly.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 1210.
 
Description
Computer and numerical methods for solving applied geoscience problems. Develops the computational skills required to solve problems in landscape evolution, geologic hazards, and Earth systems. Meets computer programming requirement for Geology and Geological Engineering majors.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 1210.
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
Fundamental physics and mathematical models of ground-water flow with selected applications in the earth sciences and engineering. Specific topics include Darcy's Law, fluid storage, equations of flow, aquifer evaluation methods, and the role of ground water in geotechnical and geologic problems.

Mining

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 1060 OR MATH 1080 OR MATH 1210 OR MATH 1220 OR MATH 1310 OR MATH 1320.
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Reasoning (Statistics/Logic)
 
Description
Use of transit, level, total station GPS, and other equipment in field surveying. Practical astronomy, calculation procedures, state plane coordinates, public-land division and introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Field demonstration and use of surveying equipment illustrate concepts presented in lecture. Laboratory fee assessed.

 

If you like...

Mechanical Engineering

You will love...

Mining

Course Details
Units: 2.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: PHYS 2220.
 
Description
Motors, three-phase power and industrial power systems; methods and equipment for moving bulk materials: hoisting and conveying.

 

 

 



If you like...

Nuclear Engineering

You will love...

Geology & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: Knowledge of Basic Algebra (Recommended).
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
Graduate students should enroll in GEOG 5368 or GEO 5368 and will be held to higher standards and/or more work. This class provides an introduction to critical energy issues facing our planet, with a focus on controversial topics and issues in Utah. These may include: hydraulic fracturing (fracking), offshore oil and gas development, oil shale and tar sand development, nuclear energy, renewable energy technologies such as wind and geothermal, the smart grid, difficulties in commercializing new energy technologies, air pollution, transportation choices, energy policy development, and global issues including population dynamics, climate change, carbon management, water resources, the Law of Unintended Consequences, and tipping points. A number of outstanding guest lecturers will provide expertise in their respective fields.

Metallurgy

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Co-requisites: CHEM 1210 OR Equivalent.
 
Description
Introduction to metallurgical processing fundamentals and applied technology that are to separate minerals and chemically process minerals to produce high purity metals as well as the application of these principles and technologies in areas such as biomedical devices and sensors, energy conversion and storage, and nuclear material processing.

 

If you like...

Parks, Recreation, and Tourism

You will love...

Geology & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Field Work and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Recommended Co-requisites: GEO 1100.
 
Description
This course will explore the Wasatch fault system and related phenomena such as landslides and groundwater hydrology using techniques from a broad array of geoscience disciplines. Investigative techniques will include geological field mapping, slope characterization, Lidar mapping, seismic and gravity surveys, and data collection from groundwater wells. Weekly lectures will introduce methods and problems to be explored, and discuss and analyze results from the field exercises. One lecture, one lab weekly.

 

 

 



If you like...

Physics

You will love...

Geology & Geophysics

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Laboratory and Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: GEO 1100 OR GEO 1110 AND CHEM 1210.
Pre/Co-requisites: MATH 1210.
Recommended Co-requisite: PHYS 2210 (or PHYS 2010 for ESCT major).
 
Description
This course will consist of an introduction to thermodynamic and geochemical concepts and their application to describe geologic processes and phenomena on and beneath the Earth’s surface. Students will learn fundamental chemical and mathematical approaches to quantitatively describe, interpret and predict a wide range of geochemical processes in Earth systems, and will learn the basic chemical and isotopic characteristics of materials making up the Earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Two lectures, one lab weekly.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Requirement Designation: Physical/Life Science Exploration
Course Attribute: Sustainability - Limited
 
Description
This is an interdisciplinary course that explores all aspects of the ocean including origins and evolution of ocean basins, physical and chemical properties of seawater, and links between circulation, currents, and climate, coastal processes, human interactions, and sustainability of ocean systems. Students will develop an “oceanic” perspective of earth systems, examine oceanic processes and the relationships between the ocean and other earth systems, and appreciate how the oceans influences societies and how humans affect the ocean.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: MATH 2210 AND PHYS 2220.
Recommended Prerequisite: MATH 3150.
 
Description
Continuum mechanics of Earth materials, tensor formulation of deformation and stress, fracture, flow, and rheology of the Earth materials; constitutive relationships; wave propagation, wave equations, reflection/refraction, travel time determinations. Introduction to analytic problem solving using computer tools.

Metallurgy

Course Details
Units: 2.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: 'C-' or better in PHYS 2220
 
Description
The course will provide a comprehensive understanding of the basics of x-ray diffraction, crystallography and the ability to use X-ray diffraction for structural analysis of powder, polycrystalline and single crystal metals, minerals and engineered materials.

Course Details
Units: 3.0
Course Components: Lecture
 
Enrollment Information
Prerequisites: 'C-' or better in CHEM 1220 AND PHYS 2210
Requirement Designation: Quantitative Intensive BS
 
Description
Phase transformations in metals and alloys: Elementary physical chemistry of phases, phase diagrams and phase rule application, diffusion in solids, structure of interfaces, nucleation and growth, solidification, pearlitic, bainitic, massive and order-disorder transformations, precipitation, elementary treatment of martensitic transformation, iron-carbon system, and heat-treatment of steels. Laboratory sessions illustrate principles developed in lectures.

For more detail about these classes, check out the Fall 2022 Class Schedule here.

For a PDF of this page, click here.

Last Updated: 3/18/22